Trolling hardbodies for bass in freshwater impoundments

Trolling hardbodies for bass in freshwater impoundments

Trolling hardbody lures for Australian bass in freshwater impoundments is a great way to relax on the water, find fish on slow days, and put less experienced anglers onto their first bass!

There is a misconception that it’s a lazy persons’ technique, but on the contrary, just like any other tactic it requires planning and thought to get the most out of it.

Choosing the right lures comes down to the depth you’re noticing the bass sitting at on the sounder; this is the key piece of the puzzle. Bass will dive or rise for food, but oftentimes they will prefer something that doesn’t require a lot of work, so getting your depth right is the main concern.

If searching for bass in a freshwater impoundment, trolling lures that dive between 12-30 feet (4-8m) can be very effective. Once the fish start responding to your lures (or if they are there and not responding), you can adjust your offerings to suit the fish on the day.

RMG Poltergeist lures by Halco Tackle are legendary as a trolling lure for bass, with the Rapala Shad Dancer and Zerek Floating Tango Shadalso excellent for this caper.

Getting your lures down deep is sometimes a challenge, but using light braided lines is one way to get the maximum depth of your chosen lure. Berkeley X5 Braided Fishing Line is a fantastic and durable braid for trolling hardbodies and is very affordable.

Remember, when you are trolling - and this goes for trolling anywhere - you aren’t driving the boat, you are driving the lure, so be mindful of a few things. Speed should be between 2-3km/h, and rods should be kept down parallel to the water and not in the air where they won’t achieve their maximum depth. Slowing the boat and even adding some action to the lure when fish are seen on the sounder can sometimes get fish to respond to your lures, while on other days this may turn them off. It pays to experiment on the day to see what the fish want.

Freshwater impoundments such as Somerset, Wivenhoe, Boondooma and Bjelke-Petersen are great trolling venues in Queensland. Further south, Lake Glenbawn and Lake St Clair in NSW offer fantastic trolling opportunities at certain times.

Remember, trolling is not lazy and is a technique that takes a long time to master, and it may help you to understand bass and bass fishing a lot better!


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